7 Questions To Ask When Picking a Joint Supplement

Rebecca Rose, InClover Research 

When I founded InClover I had just completed a global research project we called the holy grail of women’s health. We discovered a type of bacteria that could keep women healthy, if only we could get them to grow in the body. Sounds easy, right? Of course, it was hard. The body is complex and unique. I learned that we must understand the physiology (noun: the way in which a living organism or bodily part functions) of the body we are trying to get healthy in order to develop an effective solution. This nugget of knowledge is the foundation of InClover and how all our products, including Connectin, are developed.  

Joint supplements are the largest segment of the $1 Billion supplement market. Over 25% of dogs and 25% of cats would benefit from joint supplementation. These big numbers attract many companies to the joint supplement market. Helping those animals is tricky. To have a complete joint supplement, one that works and provides just what the body needs, you must develop the formulation using a holistic approach with an understanding of how the animal’s physiology is impacting the joint. This is a very different approach from contracting with a outside manufacturer to come up with a product or worse, googling what ingredients are selling and mixing them together.  These approaches yield products that are on the market right now. It is tough to know what to look for in a quality joint supplement. Skip to the end to get a list of the 7 important questions to ask. Continue reading to learn more about how Connectin was developed.  

For Connectin Joint Supplement we took this holistic and physiological approach. Let’s look at our 5-year journey to creating Connectin. We first researched the physiology of an animal’s joint, how their body converts nutrients into the joint building blocks that keep the joint comfortable and moving smoothly. And, what is preventing those building blocks from being delivered into the joint. In looking at herbs that are both powerful and gentle to create a delivery system we only considered GRAS herbs, those that have met Generally Recognized as Safe standards. Once satisfied that the formulation is natural to the body and GRAS, we started our Proof of Concept studies with Connectin. These trials invited pet parents to bring their animals to veterinarians and be a part of a study to compare Connectin to a placebo. The veterinarians and the pet parents observed the animals and answered a variety of questions including changes in range of motion, crepitus and mobility. Neither the pet parent nor the veterinarian knew if the animal was getting Connectin or a placebo. This allowed them to answer honestly with no expectation of results. Connectin significantly showed positive results compared to the placebo. We also analyzed blood work from each group of animals and confirmed no change in kidney and liver function. We then worked with the global leader in veterinary clinical testing, Massey University, to invite pet parents to bring their animals to research veterinarians for a longer and more quantitative test of Connectin compared to a placebo. All pets accepted into the study were diagnosed with joint disorder through radiographic testing. The researchers used gold standard force plate testing to measure how much force, or weight, the animal was able to put on each joint before and after being included in the trial. Additionally, all animals received full blood chemistry analyses. At the end of 60 days the results were sent to Colorado State University and unblinded. The statisticians determined that the animals on Connectin showed statistically significant improvement in the ability to bear weight and range of motion as compared to the placebo.  The blood chemistry safety testing showed no difference when compared with a placebo.  

Through clinical trials we learned that Connectin works fast, in average 15 days. We also discovered that improvement was seen in the contralateral joint- the one across from the one that was diagnosed with joint disorder. And, we discovered that Connectin did not cause any issues in blood chemistry results as compared to the placebo. Connectin is so unique we have three issued patents on the product; Connectin Patent. 

The combination of joint physiology, GRAS ingredients, complete formulation, product testing and blood testing allowed us to develop a one of a kind joint supplement that you can feel good about using and recommending.

 

7 Questions To Ask When Picking a Joint Supplement 

  1. Was the physiology of the animal used to develop the supplement, explain how?  
  2. Is the supplement complete, explain how?  
  3. Are the ingredients GRAS?  
  4. Did the supplement undergo Proof of Concept Testing? What results were seen compared with a placebo?  
  5. Did the supplement undergo Force Plate Testing? What results were seen compared with a placebo? 
  6. Did blood chemistry results show no change compared with a placebo?   
  7. Is the supplement shown to work fast? What do the results show compared with a placebo?

 

 

How much is enough? 3 things you should know about your glucosamine supplement.

By: Rebecca Rose, biochemist and founder of InClover

It is tempting to pick a joint supplement for your pet with the highest glucosamine amount and not look any further, but is this the best approach to your animal’s joint health?

Our pets’ bodies are designed to turn nutrients in their food into building blocks to cushion and lubricate their joints. When there is an upset in the system due to injury, aging, diet or genetic factors, the system breaks down and the result is joint discomfort. To protect joints against wear and tear or to support a pet exhibiting joint discomfort symptoms, you may seek out a glucosamine-based joint supplement. Here are three things you should know about glucosamine supplements:

1. Not all glucosamine is created equal.
Most commonly derived from sea mussels, glucosamine is the joint building block that provides the cushioning for the joint. Not all glucosamine is the same; there are varying qualities of this ingredient. Greater amounts of glucosamine in a product often points to a cheap, low-quality ingredient. Make sure the supplement label shows indicates the glucosamine is 99%+ pure.

2. The carrier matters.
Once you’ve determined a quality glucosamine was used in the product, you’ll want to focus on the glucosamine carrier. When you give your dog or cat a glucosamine supplement, it has another ingredient attached to carry it into the body. This carrier takes up space and replaces some of the glucosamine claimed on the label. The less expensive brands use large carriers. Product using glucosamine HCl will deliver 28% more glucosamine than those using a sulfate carrier.

3. Go beyond glucosamine.
Glucosamine is only one of three essential joint building blocks your pet’s body needs to maintain joint comfort and health. While glucosamine cushions the joint, chondroitin provides joint elasticity and hyaluronic acid lubricates the joint. Providing glucosamine alone is like filling your car with gas but never changing the oil or inflating the tires.

Joint discomfort comes with decreased circulation and increased free radical activity. These symptoms need to be overcome for the joint building blocks to be delivered. The most complete joint supplements will contain glucosamine HCl, chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid plus an herbal delivery system containing circulatory stimulants and anti-oxidants.

Looking for complete and proven joint care?
Connectin joint supplement is the only joint supplement clinically tested in double-blind, placebo-controlled university studies to show results in just 15 days!

1 in 4 Dogs Will Develop Joint Problems

By: Rebecca Rose, In Clover founder and product developer

Every morning I drag myself out of bed, cold nose nudging me along, for my morning run. My running partner and motivation is Floyd, a rescued Golden Retriever who will reward a good ear rub with a huge grin and loves everything about our early adventure. He is a morning dog and is anxious to get out his ya ya’s before going to work. We usually see 7 or 8 other dogs along the way. Shockingly, statistics suggest that 2 of these dogs have a need for joint support. They will have difficulty getting up, jumping into the car, finishing a walk. Because there are no nerve endings in the joint, the damage will be significant before they will communicate the signs of discomfort. Some safe and gentle ways to support healthy joint function in an active or aging dog include supplementation with:

  • Joint Building Blocks: Glucosamine,  Mucopolysaccharides, (Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, Hyaluronic Acid)
  • Herbs: Yucca, Black Cohosh, Cayenne, MSM
  • Anti-oxidant: Turmeric, Ginger, Devil’s Claw, Alfalfa,  Vitamin C
  • Circulatory stimulant: Nettle, Celery Seed

Additionally, supplements with the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) quality seal ensure extra quality standards are followed.